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with some employers who might not agree with future education. >> and a little bit of a rebound shaping up on wall street. >>> welcome back to "worldwide exchange." i'm kelly evans. progress is reportedly being made in talk toes avoid the u.s. fiscal cliff. another top republican lawmakers offers an olive branch to the white house. >>> and sylvia berlusconi accuses the current premier as being german-centric. >>> and the dfw returns to a new year high. >> you're watching "worldwide exchange." bringing us business news from around the globe. >>> 13220 is the level of the dow. the nasdaq is trying to add five of six points. we're seeing a bit of a rebound shaping up here in the red. the ftse global 300 is up about .2%. for the most part, it's all green across europe. the ftse 1100 adding .2%. the xetra dax and cac 40 in germany, paris, better than .5%. up 1% after falling double that yesterday. we're seeing gains in italy and portugal, ross, as invest everies have now perhaps priced in the latest turmoil in italy. >> absolutely. meanwhile, unemployment may have ticked down 7..7%. 10.9% for t
they are a government monopoly of almost always do a lousy job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apparent support. the first application had 70 letters the second was 125 letters. still deni
monopoly of almost always do a lousy job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apparent support. the first application had 70 letters the second was 125 letters. still denied. john:
results because they are a government monopoly of almost always do a lousy job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apparent support. the first application had 70 letters the seco
, educational music and videos. everything they want. >> would you let your 5-year-old use this? >> if it's educational stuff. >> this is fun and education. amazon, walmart and target. >> for kids older and the entire family, we have the curio 7. this is a real android device. 4.0. for me, i can put anything on here, but i can also put profiles up here, up to eight. i can determine what sites my kids go to, what apps they go to and how long they stay on and control all of that right here. you will find this at best buy, toys "r" us and target.com. >> this is old school. >> the next level with that cardboard box. this is the discovery kids color and play steam engine. it's recycled cardboard, eco friendly. you'll find this at kohls in-store only. >> you guys are doing a great job. thanks for everything. >> coming up, we'll get that $12 bottle of wine. >> first, these messages. gecko (clearing throat) thank you, mr. speaker, uh, members of congress. in celebration of over 75 years of our government employees insurance company, or geico...as most of you know members it.congress. ...i propose
job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to rger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apppparent support. the first application had 70 letters the second was 125 letters still denied. john: six times. this is typical. >
can't. >> you can't, you shouldn't. >> right. >> when you start slashing education, when you start slashing r&d, transportation -- >> it's over. >> -- what you're doing is, you're slashing about 3%, 4% of the budget. and you're leaving the parts of the budget that blow a hole in the deficit and destroy this economy over the next 20 years. >> by the way, we won't go over the cliff for all the reasons we're talking about. even if we do, my friends on the street tell me, it's not a disaster. it's baked in. because we're going to get it done even after the fact. so you're talking about a few points in the market. >>> we're just moments away, joe and i will be removing -- >> oh, no! there it is! >> ow! >> it's all for a great cause. >> i don't know if it's that good. >> i don't know. is this going to be good television or kind of yucky? okay. we'll be right back. americans are always ready to work hard for a better future. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never takin
. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatey stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've go together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first applition was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the applicatn. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> y. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apparent support. the first application had 70 leers the second was 125 letters. still denied. john: six times. this is typical. >> it is more and more typical. all-purpe of the charter school movement was to create new public scols, held accountable but free from most rules and regulation. but government encroaches everyday on people who want to start schools. john: the blob in charge they don't that competition state education department even the best states we hav
in the global race by switching from current spending to capital investment in science, roads and education. we offer new support for business and enterprise so they can create the jobs we need. and in everything we do we will show today we are on the side of those who want to work hard and get on. mr. speaker, the office for budget responsibility has today produced its latest economic forecast, and it is a measure of the constitutional achievement that it has taken for granted that our country's forecast is now produced independently of the treasury, free from the political interference of the past. i want to thank robert choate, his fellow members of the budget respondent committee and all their staff for their rigorous approach. one of the advantages of the creation of the abr is that not only do we get independent forecasts, we also get an independent explanation of why the forecasts are as they are. if, for example, lower rates was the result of of the government's fiscal policy, they would say so, but they do not. they say the economy has performed less strongly than expected -- >> [laugh
education, published poems, journalism, and now this journalistic memoir. how do you -- you're now the most visible member of your generation of the family, of the generation before you, there's only one survivor, a woman not much involved in public life, how do you interpret your inherent? do you see yourself as a leader in some way? do you reflect on what your responsibilities are? how do you interpret your inherent? >> it's bad to think of it that way. it's that thinking that got us here in the first place. the idea that six letters of a last name somehow qualify anyone for leadership is dangerous and served pakistan dangerly, or, rather, it has not served pakistan so i never wanted, actually, for as long as i can remember, i wanted to be a writer, always. that -- or an actress or a swimmer. [laughter] my father was not pleased about the other two choices. i'm doing what i always thought i would be doing, what i always wanted to do, my heros growing up were always journalists, writers, and i think the notion of dynasty is one that has to be repudiated in my sense because we've seen what
of cutting spending is not working. last week, demonstrators protested against cuts to the education budget. like the queues outside employment offices, protests are also becoming more common. >> the eurozone may be having problems, but german exports are surging. in the third quarter, they went up 3.6% over the same time last year. >> that is mainly because german companies have been selling more goods to countries outside the eurozone. >> times are tough for countries like spain and portugal. the economic downturn in southern europe meant that manufacturers saw their exports to some countries shrank more than 10% year-on-year, but growing demand from overseas more than balanced out the losses on the european market. the total value of exports within the european union dropped by just under 1%, but business was booming in the united states, up 26%. that rise outstripped even the increase seen from china. german cars especially remained popular overseas. i of german exports continue to sell at this rate, they could reach a record 1.1 billion euros for 2012. >> how did companies react to the
? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely different, and it still is. more distance that makes them, for me, more fascinating than the french. >> we want to take questions from the audience, but i did just want to ask you a quick question about your work in movies because that has been so extraordinarily exceptional. i think probably a lot of people --
by their education that wanted to make them as a john wayne, you know? apparently. it was very sensitive in reality. you have to be sensitive anyway. but to look real mature like that. so i wanted to show the first collection i did. for me, it was evident. the male object. i always felt, not consulted because i do not consider myself as a woman, but i felt insulted for the woman to say, you know, there was that expression for the woman. [speaking foreign language] she had a lot to say, a very modern woman. i say, is that completely stupid? maybe she is beautiful. so i say that the men i show will be balanced. i do not say that is the only object, not at all. unless maybe. but i want to show that community and men. and i wanted to show the masculinity in the woman. >> humans and in passing just now farida kelfer, the was the beginning of the showing on the runway, models who were not typical of the models at the time. i am sorry to say that is this still true that we see so little diversity on the runways. it is really shameful. you have always thought their direct there are -- showing that there is
and investing in early childhood and investing in science and stem education if you are indifferent to whether or not we reduce our budget deficit by simply taking deeper and deeper cuts in domestic discretionary budget. at some point you skip to a point where you are simply treating of between -- trading off between early to childhood and biomedical research and higher education. those are not trade-offs the american public wants us to make. when we talk about getting our fiscal discipline, our fiscal house in order, i want to remind people that when i was here in the early 1990's, one of the clarion calls, one of the reasons people make that case, was that if we had expanding deficits, it wasn't just that we would crowd out private capital. it was that we would crowd out public investment in the future, in children come in modern infrastructure, and innovation. when we decide we agree to cut spending, which we need to as but in larger deficit reduction. those of you who care about innovation need to care about how you cut, how did this spending. -- how you do spending. we have cut domestic d
. of course, rhino horn is ending up oftentimes as a form of traditional medicine, so part is about educating buyers, educating individuals to be more sophisticated in understanding there's no scientific basis for rhino horns being a medicinal cure for anything at all. also, understanding that the trade is international. here in los angeles it's a major hub for the trade in rhino horn. illegal crime syndicates, it supports militias and destabilizes nations. it's both an issue at the source. it's a consumer education awareness. if there's no demand there's no supply. we all need to come together. >> phillippe, what can we do, just as normal folks, everyday people if we want to stop something like this? >> well, as i said, it's a big consumer issue. what will surprise many people to know is that the united states is probably the second largest destination for illegal wildlife products, tigers, ivory, rhino horn. in many cases there are even websites here in the united states that cater, fashion websites, antique websites that cater to the illegal ivory trade, for example. lots of rhino horn her
. that is deviating away from what the real problems in education are. if you know that finland has the number one school system in the world and part of that process is making the standards so rigorous and they only the best of the best and same time they pay significantly more for teachers and once they earned that title. they earned complete autonomy over the class roommate. part of the problem we have so much regulation and mandates and we are dictated to how to teach in our classrooms. what is the point in making standards when we don't have the option to use professional judgment as it am is. >> steve: thank you very much for joining us on the wednesday morning from beautiful orlando, florida. thank you. >> thank you for having me. >> gretchen: we have a hypochrissy alert. remember michael moor's latest ovie bashing tax rate breaks. >> steve: and a big secret and writing a letter to his younger self as a warning for others not to do the same thing. coach k will reveal that letter with brian next on "fox and friends" ♪ ♪ than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, bu
exceptionalism, only it won't be called that. the board of education approved teaching the, quote, creation and organization of the american government and what has made it successful. so they'll do it. they just won't call it that. >> brian: let's take a look at what happened some of the best moments. let's pick some of the moments in the nfl. european version of football. indiana, huge win over georgetown. another national championship. they beat georgetown 1-0. their eighth championship. congratulations to georgetown. best rookie moves as we switch to football, david wilson. he fumbled earlier in the year. then all of a sudden, he thought, i think i can run this back all the way. 97 yards. he'd have three touchdowns on the day. he would have more yards than anybody else in giant history and lead the giants to a victory over the not so mighty saints. >>> three theroux -- throw under duress, ben roethlisberger. final score 34-24. chargers upset the steelers. that's a quick look at what's happening in the world of sports. >> gretchen: earlier we were talking about the top five gripes that
into education, into science, into infrastructure as well and he'll be talking about the infrastructure initiatives including more must be for small to medium size businesses, more money for power stations as well. but it really looks like he's got very little room for maneuver. the opposition, he'll get that and say this is your fault, these are your policies. mr. osbourne will turn around and say look what's turning around you. look what's going on in the financial sector. look what's going on in the eurozone as well where unemployment is actually on the surface much worse than it is in the united kingdom. so it's going to be the usual ding dong battle of theatre. but i doubt we'll see many new initiatives that haven't been leaked already, ross. >> yeah, you only have to read the papers today and everything seems to be in there. i think you've done a very good two and a half-minute analysis of everything we might get. well-done. we'll come back to you later. get a cup of coffee, stay warm. julian joins us with his own thoughts. steve got into all the details. he's laid it all out for
to the problem is for americans to become educated on how to cut spending. how you eliminate the tax deductions and expand the tax base so that you can increase the revenue without punishing segment of society. that doesn't it in the simp sob cartoon. they couldn't articulate that in a comical way. we are run by liberals who never spent a dollar they couldn't spend twice. obama could be a great foreign policy president if he pretended the enemies are rich americans. >> bob: you don't think there is waste in defense? >> greg: absolutely. i do think there is a waste of defense. >> dana: the waste in defense, climate change programs that they have to do. >> eric: greg pointed out things that are important. listen to the genius, howard dean. >> the only problem, truth is everybody needs to pay more taxes, not just the rich. >> that is not harasssy, that is honesty. honest moment for the first time. >> bob: can you tell us 30 seconds to tell us how to get the deficit down? >> greg: stop spending. >> bob: i get that. >> eric: i don't need 30 seconds. go over the fiscal cliff. take $1.2 trillion out
education money and school money. so they have taken those off the table, which leads maybe cost of living adjustment on medicare and social security. and not much else. so, i think that is where we are now. >> jeff, from your reporting where do you get a sense of where we're headed in this. >> troubling sign of the message of closed door meeting where speaker boehner said the members should leave their christmas decorations up. and that they should plan to stay in. i think that one channel for speaker boehner here, he is beginning to face some rumblings of trouble on the right. so far, i think they have been able to do a good job holding everyone together on this. some are members of the house republican caucus that were outspoken after this closed door meeting, telling reporters that speaker boehner, you know is responsible for this. is not negotiating a hard enough. so he has problems on both planks. i think that, i think there is still time. it's december 12, i guess. so i think that by the end of the week, you know, there isn't sort of some more agreement it's a problem. i still think
of it is of their own making. you cannot start with the education of the kids, teaching them to aid israel and everything it stands for and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. so there are a lot of conditions . it can't happen overnight. so does the central part of the problem is they created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of reasonable deal. >> expressed some pessimism or realism about what is likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops. there will be back, a senseless, to where it was before september 11th. what happens in pakistan after that? democratic, emphasis on semi. >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as you apply them there will be circumstances for some nuance and potential compromise has required, then you approached all of these problems the way. you have very good intelligence. you can understand what is going on with in
, he is -- he's a real leader. he's really smart. he's very well educated, has a graduate degree. he was raised all over the world because his parents were both in the military, both of them. and he has these core values. he was elected captain by his teammates as a rookie quarterback early on because he's signified this. i mean, this is a guy who helped put six points on the board after fumbling, a rare fumble, if you saw that play on monday night. >> yeah. >> sort of a weird play. we were all screaming, you know, that was a fumble! because obviously, if it hadn't been, it wouldn't have been six points. mike, he is really a very special character. this is not just spin. >> sam stein, i realize you went to school in the woods up there in dartmouth, but the idea of living in a metropolitan area, washington, d.c., where nearly everyone is obsessed with a single individual, the quarterback of the washington redskins, is incredible. >> andrea says this is not spin, but she's literally spinning. it's unbelievable, she's so happy with this guy. he fumbles correctly, this man walks on water
people, but the education to stop producing them. >> that's sad. how do we get that back? >> well, it's a concerted effort to get them back. and with this project i've talked about where we will do a mac in the united states next year, i think this is -- this is a really good step for us. and the consumer electronics world was really never here. it's not a matter of bringing it back, it's a matter of starting it here. >> good morning, thanks for joining us here. >> while steve jobs liked to avoid the spotlight, he also thrived on it. as if he was selling products that were pieces of his own soul. he was inventor, pitch man, and new wave pied piper all in one. tim cook is just a different guy. while he believes in the almighty product just as much. >> how are you not steve jobs? >> in many ways, one of the things he did for me that removed a gigantic burden that would've normally existed is he told me on a couple of occasions before he passed away to never question what he would've done. never ask the question what he would do, to just do what's right. >> brian williams' conversation w
research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> welcome back. it's a performance enhancing trick called window dressing used by managers to boost their yearly returns. joining us to protect your money and the risk, understanding the risk better, is ronn ensana. good to see you. what exactly is window dressing? let's get right to the source of this issue. we see it every year. explain it. >> if depends. we've been doing this for 28 years together. when we first started talking about it, it was a way for a portfolio manager not to look dumb. this is what they're talking about in "the wall street journal" today. th
schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. sponsored report gave a full endorsement that more liquid natural gas exports will help our economy and more shale oil and gas production will make us energy independent. question, will the epa keep its snout out of this great breakthrough energy process? here now to tell us is john hoffmeister. john, what's this take on the liquefied natural gas? i didn't even know there were constraints on their exports. >> well, the department of energy has to grant permits to economies that would seek to export natural gas. the study that came out was not an endorsement by the department energy, not yet. it was a third-party report analyzing the situation. it will now go into public discussion. the department of energy hasn't really taken a position yet opt report. but here's the reality. this is buried treasure, larry, this is buried treasure in this country, natural gas, i mean, that could be the stimulus that this economy has been loo
and riding in particular but educated people and become more discriminating, become more effective judges of what makes something good. people buy books, this is a book loving community and the institute has done all loss and enhanced that. on some level create the environment in which people can explore literature especially. there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite ridge. we are any feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation as the writers institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers, in columbia county where a lot of new york city writers have weekend homes all the way up to saratoga and beyond, the writers colony -- the writers' groups in hudson, n.y. east and west into western massachusetts, west to syracuse. that is the audience, sort of circumference we work with so when you go back and you find a general population quite proud of albany's connection to henry james and herman melville or bret harte or a little bit further eas
missiles. >> they were in israel. >> they were in israel. >> go back to your education, then. where did you go to college? >> i did a b.a./m.a. of middle eastern history at columbia college. an m.a. and b.a.in middle eastern at princeton. >> israeli and american citizen? >> i am. >> why due end up in the 1982 war in lebanon? >> i always wanted to move to israel. i saw my future in israel. i wanted to raise my family in israel. in 1973, at the end of the 1973 war which i would have missed had i been living in israel, i determined i wasn't going to move just then. i was going to do my b.a. first. i did my b.a. which turned out as an m.a. i worked as an advisor to the israeli administration to the u.n. arafat speaking for the general assembly. very tumultuous period. i moved to israel and tried for this unit in the army. the tryouts are rather rigorous. i did 17 months of basic training. and got out just prior to the lebanon war. but in israel, we have -- you serve for a long period your regular serve and do reserve service to the age of 52. now i have a son in the army who is 19. and in a ver
of security for our seniors. the education of our children. for the safety of our neighborhoods. this is just asking them to pay a little bit more while they continue to get the same tax cuts that everyone does. 100% of the american people get a tax cut, the upper 2% are asked to pay a little bit more. so i thank the speaker for finally at least uttering the words on the floor of the house about what is -- what the decisions are that need to be made. again, we committed to the cut. we acted upon the entitlements. the president has more in his budget. all of this would be a down payment for as we go forward into the next session of congress to talk about tax simplification and fairness, how we can have lower rates while plugging up loopholes and having a tax code that is -- encourages growth in our country. but that's along the discussion. as we address the issue of how we strengthen our entitlements, not by diminishing benefits but by getting more for what we are spending. so social security, any changes in social security should be left to strengthen social security. if it's medicare, any ch
people to excellent artwork and writing in particular, but we've educated people to become more discriminating, to become more effective judges of what makes something good. and people read. people buy books. this is a very book-loving commitment, and i think the writer's institute has done a lot to, um, enhance that. even on some level create the environment in which people can explore literature especially. i think that there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite, quite rich, and we're in a kind of feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation as the writer's institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers writers -- find sort of an arc down from columbia county where a lot of new york city writers have weekend homes all the way up to saratoga and beyond. we have places like the writer's colony, writers' groups in hudson, new york, east and west into western massachusetts and west to syracuse. that's the audience sort of circumfe
of education, or some of these mosquito abatement, so it's in essence to get that money? >> yes, it's overlapping local government districts that, yeah, pay for all sorts of things. >> okay. now before this involvement, what was the limitation of restriction in getting that money that caused this to develop? >> oh, this was in the 1800s, and the state limited the amount of debt that municipalities could carry. so, to get around that debt limit they created, you know, all sorts of different taxing districts that overlap. >> now what's the second largest in terms of fifedoms? >> pennsylvania. which has a similar township system. a lot of very, very tiny governments. >> another state that is far from economic engine, locomotive with a lot of horsepower. and then beyond those two, beyond illinois and pennsylvania, what happens there, whet? >> then it starts to correlate a lot more with the size of the state. illinois and pennsylvania are really outliers in terms of the number of governments compared to the number of people we have. >> i find this really fascinating at this point in hist
on education and gives scholarships for youth kids. >>> 7:55. sal is here. you know what's happening on the roads. sal? >> that's right, you know, dave and tori, the traffic is actually going to be a little bit better than it was. still pretty slow. we're gonna go to the toll plaza. yesterday, we had such a bad day. people were complaining pretty loud. today it's backed up to the maze. it's not going any farther than that. about a 25 to 30-minute delay. yesterday was almost an hour for some people. let's take a look at interstate 880. northbound 880 traffic is busy as you pass the coliseum. that's a change from last time. we're seeing some stop-and-go traffic here. i want to mention the car fire. it was a van on fire. if you are trying to catch a flight, get on the road early. 1011 a mess through san bruno -- 101 is a mess through san bruno. and northbound 280 at race street, there is a -- a crash on the cole -- shoulder. >>> let's go to steve. >> a lot of fog out there kind of sneaking its way around. disappears, shows up. numerous reports. that is spooky fog there, the low fog. peg
middle class, fee mill education and access to birth control, it plummets. in europe there's not replacement level. losing-- >> it doesn't make me comfortable that our birth rate is less than fronts. when we're talking about 20-year-old women, waiting until they're 30 and 30-year-old women in their 40's and during that gap our numbers are going to dip. do i think it's artificial? there are a lot of factors, do i think that overall people are not making children. i think they're making choices. stuart: you're he jewish. >> yes. orthodox jewish. do they believe in birth control. >> and many rabbis agree it has it's more than the number we're looking at. stuart: you say as a matter of principle. having children is not a function of the your particular family, not a function of how much money you've got, it's something else entirely. >> it comes from a drive within. does it help families not doing it from a religious point of view for government incentives to have other wayssto make life easier having children, making college less expensive, making child care less expensive. ab
wisdom has it, it's taxes, taxes, taxes. is it something more? >> how about lack the education? the school system used to be number one is now 49th in the country and taxes another reason for it, cost of living another reason for it and no vision into the future that's going to get better and somebody said in california the houses are free. and the weather is what costs you money. and people came to a point saying, hey, maybe the weather isn't worth the money anymore and as companies leave, about 17 a month, stuart, are leaving the state of california, but it's not just the companies moving. when they leave, they take the work force with them to the state that they move to. >> yeah, that's a good question. and we know that the raw number is 100,000, net migrating out of california. do you know who those people are? i mean, you've got an extra 100,000 leaving. i don't know who those people are. >> well, those people are actually the people who used to be here in california and made a living, paid taxes and what have you. it's the tax base that's leaving the state of california a
. they described that as less than .1% of the total global production of c.f.c. so for the purposes of education of the body, i did want to provide that information as to a definition of piddling. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california. mr. waxman: i'm pleased to yield to the gentlelady from california, an important member of the energy and commerce committee, ms. castor, five minutes. the speaker pro tempore: five minutes. the gentlewoman from florida is recognized for five minutes. ms. castor: i thank the ranking member for yielding me the time. madam speaker, there are a number of reasons that h.r. 6190 is poor public policy, but i'd like to focus on just one and that is the unfair advantage that this bill will grant to a single business to the detriment of other businesses and manufacturers. and in fact the congress has received a letter from the international pharmaceutical aerosol consortium. on behalf of the international pharmaceutical aerosol consortium for those who treat respiratory illness such as asthma and constructive pulmonary dis
currency trading on fridays 5:30 eastern and if you want more education about currencies, go to currency class@money motion.cnbc.com. >>> a bigger than expected slide in the past week down by 2.4 million barrels. crude supplies fell by 2.4 million barrels. 7.9 million barrels was the rise in gasoline inventories. then we are also looking at fuel supplies that were up by 3 million barrels. up by 3 million barrels. we are looking right now at a sell-off in the oil market. we're still holding above the $88 mark for wti crude futures. we're also looking at lower prices for gasoline because of that huge build we saw and higher prices for heating oil. a proxy for diesel fuel and reflecting the distillate fuel supply number. bigger builds than were anticipated for gasoline and a bigger decline than was expected for crude supplies. send it back to you. >> thank you so much. when we come back, deal making in a post-fiscal cliff world. faber has an exclusive interview with the ceo of investment bank moelis and company. more in just a moment. >> announcer: the holiday season is here and that means
, early childhood education 12-1 on the return. you can't get that on the stock market. >> stephanie: representative you guys stay strong and keep fighting because i gotta say you know, you look at any poll and people are with us on these issues, you know. you can look at -- >> i agree. >> stephanie: tax cuts proveably caused these deficits. the social security does not -- doesn't add a cent to the deficit. >> i ran on this in a conservative district very clearly stated my position that i did not want to. i had to last time when the president asked us to, to extend all of the taxes for one year and that was a darn bitter pill for me to swallow. i was one of the democrats that voted on to get it through. i'm not going to do it again. it doesn't add to the economy and those top 2 don't need to get done. we all do agree on the bottom ones and i just -- i think now they've got themselves in a pretty tight box. i hope you keep beating the drum on this. >> stephanie: i think you're a helper. you're giving
in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. >>> it is interesting to zero how -- the guidance is below street consensus and looks immediately through it because they think you are sandbagging that guidance. so walk us through the deceleration in same store sales growth. why are you giving this forecast? is it capacity issues? what is behind the slowdown? >> i don't think it's really capacity issues for us at all. i think we have great product in the store right now. we definitely lost some momentum in the middle, or the beginning of the quarter in november. where we had some technical issues with our product notifications, which we send out to guests, so we weren't driving traffic to our stores
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